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What Types of Windows Would Work Best for Your Home

Are you considering replacing or adding new windows to your home? Here's how to figure out what types of windows would work best for your space.

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Has your utility bill been rising?

Don’t be quick to blame the weather or poor operations.

The types of windows in your home may have something to do with it.

Windows do more than create a brighter and healthier environment for your house. They offer insulation against loss of heat and air. They also keep your home cool during the hot summer months.

If your windows have lost that airtight seal, you may need to replace them.

Similarly, if you’re building a new home, you’ll need windows that offer efficient insulation.

To help make your window-buying decision less overwhelming, we’ve compiled a guide on the different types of windows available on the market.

Types of Windows Based on Material

The material used to make your windows determines their insulation ability, maintenance, durability, and cost.

Here’s information on a few materials used to make windows.

Wood

Windows made from wood are naturally beautiful. They offer the best insulation keeping your house warm.

Additionally, wood gets harder with age making it extremely durable. Wood windows can be easily painted to match the color of your house.

However, these windows are costly and hard to maintain. They’re also susceptible to damage from pests and rot, especially if you live in humid areas.

Vinyl

Vinyl or PVC windows are cheap. This doesn’t mean they‘re of low-quality. In fact, they’re made of a non-corrosive and fire-resistant material.

Further, vinyl windows are popular due to their functionality. You can swing them inside or outside for easy cleaning.

Due to their insulation abilities, they’ll significantly reduce your heating and air conditioning costs. They’re resistant to different elements making them maintenance-free.

It’s possible to have your vinyl windows custom made to match the color, size, and style of your home. You can’t repaint vinyl windows, so be sure to get the color right before installation.

Aluminum

Extremely lightweight, aluminum windows are also strong and durable. If you plan to have windows with unusual shapes, choose the aluminum material since it’s easy to manipulate.

However, aluminum windows don’t hold heat. Nevertheless, you can have them made with thermal breaks within the window frames to prevent heat loss.

Fiberglass Windows

These are composite windows made of glass fibers and polyester resin. They’re popular in green buildings due to their low impact on the environment. Fiberglass windows offer high insulation since their thermal conductivity is 800 times less than aluminum.

The material is resistant to moisture, high temperatures, and pests. It also requires little maintenance, as it won’t bend or scratch.

Despite its many advantages, fiberglass is costly. It also fades with age due to the effect of the UV rays.

Types of Windows Based on Their Operational Movement

The operational movement of a window determines its efficiency and ease of opening or closing. The most common types of windows based on this criterion include:

1. Fixed or Stationary Windows

As the name suggests, these windows can’t open or close. This makes them waterproof. They also provide an excellent view of the outside scenery adding some beauty to your home.

Additionally, they‘re an extremely energy efficient option since they have fully glazed shutters that provide maximum natural light to your home. The shutters are fixed to the frame for maximum insulation. A few types of fixed windows include:

Bay Windows

A bay window has three window panes. The center pane is often fixed and larger than the other side panes.

This window type captures more light and provides a beautiful outside view. It can also add an architectural style to your home and enhance the room space.

Bow Windows

Bow windows consist of four or more window panels placed together to look like a bow. These panels are fixed or vented.

Fixed bow windows have an elegant curved-round appearance. They offer a great spot for you to sit and enjoy the sun. Unlike the bay windows, it’s possible to install the bow windows at the corner of a room.

Pencil Windows

These fixed windows have a single rectangular or square glass pane. They bring the outdoor beauty in a room.

They’re energy efficient as they let the light in, enhancing the colors in your room. You can also use them in rooms that don’t need ventilation for an unobstructed view.

Transom Windows

Transom windows are found at the top of a door or window transom. In the past, most of them were operable to allow for ventilation. Today, it’s rare to find a transom window that opens.

They allow light in your home, especially in the morning and evening hours. They’re simply used for decorative purposes.

Glass Block Windows

Clear glass block windows are a durable option when you want to let the natural light in. They’re commonly used in bathrooms since they’re translucent enough for privacy.

2. Operable Windows

An operable window has movable sections. They’re ideal for rooms that need ventilation. They’re also easy to clean compared to the stationary windows.

Here are a few options to choose from:

Double and Single Hung Windows

Single hung windows have two panels. The bottom panel is operable while the upper panel is fixed. Once opened, the bottom panel partially obstructs the lower slash leading to limited ventilation.

Both the upper and lower slash in a double hung window can open for enhanced ventilation. Double hang windows are easier to clean since its slashes can tilt both inward and outward.

Casement and Awning Windows

These two windows are also known as crank windows because they use a cracking mechanism to open.

Casement windows have a hinge on the side and open outward. Due to their large glass panes, they give enough light and ventilation.

Awning windows have a hinge at the top and also open outward. They’re easy to operate making them ideal for hard to reach places such as bathrooms, near sinks, and countertops.

Awning windows offer protection from light showers and can be left open during the wet season.

Sliding and Folding Windows

Folding windows have more than one panel whose frames are hinged to each other. The window slides horizontally when opening. Since there are no bars obstructing the window, they give a perfect view and maximum ventilation when opened.

The sliding windows have slashes that slide on either side with one pane sliding over the other. They’re easy to operate and clean. They also offer minimum air leakage when closed.

Windows Based On the Shutter Construction

The material used to make your window shutter will determine the amount of light that gets to your home.

Louvered Windows

A louver or jalousie window has a series of louvers made of metal, wood, or glass. The louvers are fixed or operable. They slope at 45 degrees to run off rainwater.

This window doesn’t allow outside vision but offers maximum ventilation. They’re common in bathrooms and other private areas.

Glazed Windows

These are windows with glass panels. They can be single-glazed or insulated windows made of double or triple glazing.

These windows provide excellent sound insulation and are also energy efficient. You can tint them to reduce glare.

Paneled Windows

Paneled windows are made of wood, vinyl, or aluminum panels. When closed these windows don’t let any light in. They’re strong and durable, making them hard to break.

Paneled windows don’t require a lot of maintenance. Additionally, wooden paneled windows have elegant natural beauty, but they’re more expensive.

What Window Type Will You Choose?

Installing the right window for your home is essential. If you’re a homeowner, we hope we’ve provided you with all the necessary types of windows.

And, if you’re a window seller looking to create a website to showcase your products, check out our website templates.

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